HOLLYWOOD

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ABOUT HOLLYWOOD

FIRST OF ALL LET ME START WITH A BRIEF INTRODUCTION ABOUT THE HOLLYWOOD,WE MAY THINK WHAT THE NAME  “HOLLYWOOD” MEANS IT’S ACTUALLY

Is a district in Los AngelesCaliforniaUnited States, situated west-northwest of Downtown Los Angeles.The name itself represent a new era of filming,Today, much of the movie industry has dispersed into surrounding cities such as Burbank and the Los Angeles Westside, but significant auxiliary industries, such as editingeffects,propspost-production and lighting companies, remain in Hollywood.

As a portion of the city of Los Angeles, Hollywood does not have its own municipal government, but does have an official, appointed by the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce, who serves as an honorary “Mayor of Hollywood” for ceremonial purposes only. Johnny Grant held this position for decades, until his death on January 9, 2008.

         Hollywood has become an iconic name for film industry so that various        other locations associated with film industry are nicknamed with a blend of the name Hollywood along with the location of that film industry.   

HOLLYWOOD HISTORY

In 1853, one adobe hut stood on the site that became Hollywood. By 1870, an agricultural community flourished in the area with thriving crops. A locally popular etymology is that the name “Hollywood” traces to the ample stands of native Toyon or “California Holly”, that cover the hillsides with clusters of bright red berries each winter. But this and accounts of the name coming from imported holly then growing in the area, are not confirmed. The name Hollywood was coined by H. J. Whitley, the Father of Hollywood. He and his wife, Gigi, came up with the name while on their honeymoon in 1886, according to Margaret Virginia Whitley‘s memoir. By 1900, the community then called Cahuenga had a post office, newspaper, hotel and two markets, along with a population of 500. Los Angeles, with a population of 100,000 people at the time, lay 10 miles (16 km) east through the citrus groves. A single-track streetcar line ran down the middle of Prospect Avenue from it, but service was infrequent and the trip took two hours. The old citrus fruit packing house would be converted into a livery stable, improving transportation for the inhabitants of Hollywood.

The first section of the famous Hollywood Hotel, the first major hotel in Hollywood, was opened in 1902, by H. J. Whitley, the President of the Los Pacific Bolevard and Development Company of which he was a major shareholder. He was eager to sell residential lots among the lemon ranches then lining the foothills. Flanking the west side of Highland Avenue, the structure fronted on Prospect Avenue. Still a dusty, unpaved road, it was regularly graded and graveled.

Hollywood was incorporated as a municipality in 1903. Among the town ordinances was one prohibiting the sale of liquor except by pharmacists and one outlawing the driving of cattle through the streets in herds of more than two hundred. In 1904, a new trolley car track running from Los Angeles to Hollywood up Prospect Avenue was opened. The system was called “the Hollywood Boulevard.” It cut travel time to and from Los Angeles drastically.

By 1910, because of an ongoing struggle to secure an adequate water supply, the townsmen voted for Hollywood to be annexed into the City of Los Angeles, as the water system of the growing city had opened the Los Angeles Aqueduct and was piping water down from the Owens River in the Owens Valley. Another reason for the vote was that Hollywood could have access to drainage through Los Angeles´ sewer system. With annexation, the name of Prospect Avenue was changed to Hollywood Boulevard and all the street numbers in the new district changed. For example, 100 Prospect Avenue, atVermont Avenue, became 6400 Hollywood Boulevard; and 100 Cahuenga Boulevard, at Hollywood Boulevard, changed to 1700 Cahuenga Boulevard.

 

the above description is adapted from

  • Keith, Gaelyn Whitley (2006). The Father of Hollywood: The True Story. BookSurge Publishing. 
  • Koszarski, Richard (1994). An Evening’s Entertainment: The Age of the Silent Feature Picture, University of California Press.



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May 15, 2009 - Posted by | CLASSIC

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